Attic Insulation Options: Good, Better and Best

When it comes to home insulation, the first area that comes to mind is the attic. Airflow in buildings moves from ground to sky,…

When it comes to home insulation, the first area that comes to mind is the attic. Airflow in buildings moves from ground to sky, naturally pulling conditioned indoor air up and out of a structure. Proper attic insulation helps keep conditioned air inside your home and helps keep your home comfortable. To help you choose the best attic insulation option for your new home, we’ve rated three popular methods:

Good: Blown-in Fiberglass
Adding blown-in fiberglass insulation to a new attic is a quick and easy way to increase R-value. This basic method of attic insulation is a cost effective option.

Better: Blown-in Fiberglass with Air Sealing
Insulating and sealing air leaks dramatically improve the energy efficiency of a new home. The first step is to seal penetration points around the attic floor. After air sealing is complete, a blanket of blown-in fiberglass insulation is installed. This method helps keep conditioned air inside the home and adds R-value.

Best: Spray Foam Insulation
Installing spray foam insulation in the attic of a new home provides optimal energy protection. Spray foam is installed along the roofline to create a thermal barrier along the attic ceiling and seal any air leaks. This application provides the best energy benefits available in one easy step.

Adding insulation to your attic is one of the most cost effective ways to save money on your energy bills each month. Wondering which insulation method is right for your new home project? Have questions on one of the methods or other insulation options for a new home? Contact our office today!

Three Ways to Minimize Mold

Mold in a home can cause a variety of problems for homeowners and builders. Mold can affect indoor air quality, create health issues for occupants, and be a complicated problem to fix.

In order for mold to grow it needs mold spores to be present (which are all around), moisture, and warm temperatures. While all three elements are necessary for mold to grow, moisture regulation is a significant contributor that can be managed.

While moisture in a home is impossible to avoid, there are a few simple ways to decrease the likelihood of developing mold:

  1. Seal the Building Envelope.
    Properly air sealing wall cavities helps keep moist outside air out of the home. If needed, allow drying time for the materials before closing up the wall. This should include carefully monitoring humidity levels on the job site.
  2. Add Proper Ventilation.
    When a building is air sealed, it’s important to have a proper ventilation system. This helps move out any damp air that could contribute to mold issues in the home.
  3. Seal Basement Box Sills.
    One of the most common areas where mold growth is found is on basement rim joists and box sills. When basement box sills are insulated with fiberglass batts and not air sealed, moist outside air can infiltrate the home and mold can build up behind these batts. Insulating and sealing box sills with spray foam insulation can prevent infiltration of moist outside air.

Taking the necessary steps to prevent mold from the beginning will save headaches and money for homeowners. Concerned about mold in your home? We can help. Contact us for a free estimate.

 

What You Don’t Know About Your Home’s Air Quality

paint brush, plant and cleaning supplies

Did you know the majority of our exposure to air pollutants is from indoor air we breathe?

You may be surprised to learn that indoor air (in your home, office, etc.) can be two to five times more polluted than outdoor air. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) estimates that the average person receives 72 percent of their chemical exposure at home. When considering the significant amount of time we spend indoors – in our homes, offices, and more – indoor air quality becomes even more important.

Indoor air pollutants come from different sources. Some indoor air pollutants are a byproduct of construction materials, home furnishings, products used to clean the home, and more. Other indoor air pollutants come from air infiltration that isn’t properly managed or controlled.

There are many ways to improve your home’s indoor air quality. Here are some tips:

Seal Air Leaks – Sealing air leaks helps create a controlled indoor environment. A qualified auditor or contractor can recommend a plan to air seal your home. Spray foam insulation can add r-value to your home and seal air leaks in one step.

Properly Ventilate – Once air leaks are sealed and there is a controlled indoor environment, the home can be properly ventilated. A mechanical ventilation system with good filtration can help remove polluted indoor air from the house.

Reduce Indoor Chemicals – Choose products that have low chemical emissions. This can include cleaning products, home furnishings that are added to the home, and more. This will help your home ventilation system work most effectively.

Have questions about your home’s indoor air quality? Contact our office, our team is happy to help.